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      • Disposal or re-purposing of old LLIN’s
        There has been an interesting e-mail discussion thread recently exploring what could or should be done with LLIN's after their intended period of use and replacement with a new issue of nets. WHO guidelines are that old nets with no further use should either be incinerated or buried, and strongly advised against use of such old nets for fishing (https://www.who.int/malaria/publications/atoz/who-recommendation-managing-old-llins-mar2014.pdf). The danger of use of using old nets for fishing is not so much the environmental contamination through leaching of synthetic pyrethroids, but more specifically the small mesh size that does not allow small "next-generation" fish to pass through and therefore seriously impacts on fish population sustainability. Because of the cost associated with collection and incineration of old nets, the default practise has been that old nets tend to be re-purposed for household use in multiple ways including as netting to cover windows and doors, hammocks for babies, curtains, containers to hold vegetables, fruit, or other household items, chicken coops, protective covers over fruit on trees against birds and bats etc etc. It seems that incineration is not practical, burial is a good option, but many people simply re-purpose as explained above and when the net is too shredded and flimsy for further use then it is simply thrown on the rubbish pile. Do you have any suggestions or thoughts on this matter? Please post them here. I thank Mehul Dhorda for initiating this discussion, and Michael MacDonald, Michael Bangs, Jeffrey Hii, Dr Rose Nani Mudin, Htin Kyaw Thu and Tom Burkot for sharing their thoughts in the email on which this piece is based.
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    DIRECTORY
    FORUM
    Contact Table
    Name Organization E-Mail Contact
    Leo Braack Malaria Consortium l.braack@malariaconsortium.org
    Htin Kyaw Thu Malaria Consortium h.thu@malariaconsortium.org
    Webinar

    Webinar: Esri’s ArcGIS Online Operations Dashboard for Vector Control

    Home Forums

      • Forum
      • Topics
      • Posts
      • Last Post
      • Disposal or re-purposing of old LLIN’s
        There has been an interesting e-mail discussion thread recently exploring what could or should be done with LLIN's after their intended period of use and replacement with a new issue of nets. WHO guidelines are that old nets with no further use should either be incinerated or buried, and strongly advised against use of such old nets for fishing (https://www.who.int/malaria/publications/atoz/who-recommendation-managing-old-llins-mar2014.pdf). The danger of use of using old nets for fishing is not so much the environmental contamination through leaching of synthetic pyrethroids, but more specifically the small mesh size that does not allow small "next-generation" fish to pass through and therefore seriously impacts on fish population sustainability. Because of the cost associated with collection and incineration of old nets, the default practise has been that old nets tend to be re-purposed for household use in multiple ways including as netting to cover windows and doors, hammocks for babies, curtains, containers to hold vegetables, fruit, or other household items, chicken coops, protective covers over fruit on trees against birds and bats etc etc. It seems that incineration is not practical, burial is a good option, but many people simply re-purpose as explained above and when the net is too shredded and flimsy for further use then it is simply thrown on the rubbish pile. Do you have any suggestions or thoughts on this matter? Please post them here. I thank Mehul Dhorda for initiating this discussion, and Michael MacDonald, Michael Bangs, Jeffrey Hii, Dr Rose Nani Mudin, Htin Kyaw Thu and Tom Burkot for sharing their thoughts in the email on which this piece is based.
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